Oct 11

MICROSOFT OFFICE TUTOR: Tired Of Blue? Give Excel 2007 A New Color Scheme

Excel 2007 gives you a lot of new visual options when it comes to building a spreadsheet. You can apply themes to your data and use new shape effects and conditional formatting looks. But what about your Excel application itself? Believe it or not, you don’t need to stick with Microsoft’s traditional blue color scheme.

To change your Excel application’s color scheme:
Continue reading

For more specialized tips on leadership subscribe to our
monthly newsletter now!
Sep 27

MICROSOFT OFFICE TUTOR: Keep your check boxes onscreen — not on printouts

Check boxes are a helpful form control when a user needs to make true/false (yes/no) decisions. However, you may not want them hanging around for a printout. If the user makes selections in an Excel invoice and you want to print the completed invoice, the check boxes just take up unnecessary space. They no longer serve a purpose. Fortunately, you can exclude form controls from your printouts. To prevent a check box from printing:
Continue reading

For more specialized tips on leadership subscribe to our
monthly newsletter now!
Aug 30

MICROSOFT OFFICE TUTOR: Change the default chart font in Excel

Excel’s charts include text in many places — the title, legend, axis labels, and data series labels, for instance. To change the default font for these text objects, you may approach the task by formatting each type of object individually. However, if you want to make the same font changes throughout your chart, you can do it all at once. Double-click on the chart area (the white area just within the border of the chart) to display the Format Chart Area dialog box. Then, select the font settings you want to use throughout your chart, and click OK.
Continue reading

For more specialized tips on leadership subscribe to our
monthly newsletter now!
Aug 16

MICROSOFT OFFICE TUTOR: Print only the data you want to include

Printing an Excel spreadsheet doesn’t always run smoothly. Often, your data splits awkwardly between pages or you try to fit so much on one page that you can’t read the numbers. You can avoid most of these printing problems by focusing on only the data you really want to print.
Continue reading

For more specialized tips on leadership subscribe to our
monthly newsletter now!
Jul 12

MICROSOFT OFFICE TUTOR: Zoom in on your data in seconds

If your mouse has a wheel, you probably use it to scroll up and down through lengthy worksheets. You may not realize that you can also use it to change the zoom percentage for your view of the worksheet.

To do so, hold down the [Ctrl] key and move the scroll wheel. Rolling the wheel down decreases the zoom percentage and rolling it up increases the zoom percentage. Note that if you’re using Excel 2000, the zoom will only go up to 100 percent.
Continue reading

For more specialized tips on leadership subscribe to our
monthly newsletter now!