Feb 14

Woo Back Your Dissatisfied Clients

There are times when you need to mend fences with unhappy customers. Here’s how.

On average, companies lose 20 to 40 percent of their customers each year. This number is steadily increasing as businesses and customers alike begin tightening their wallets.

Good news: You can save roughly half of your lost clients simply by asking them how you can better meet their needs, says Jill Griffin, author of Customer Loyalty: How To Earn It, How To Keep It. She suggests you take these six steps to woo customers back: Continue reading

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Oct 15

CUSTOMER SERVICE CORNER: Keep Customers’ Information Safe

285_2758456With frequent news coverage about data escaping government (and other) offices and posing potential security failures, more customers are feeling a little insecure about their personal information.

Here are a few practices you can implement to make sure that no personal data escapes your company:
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Aug 06

CUSTOMER SERVICE CORNER: 5 ways to talk money

27_2509564Money. No one wants to talk about it, but that’s what everyone’s thinking about. How much will the product cost? What discounts are available? What will this sale mean for the company’s bottom line?
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Jun 18

CUSTOMER SERVICE CORNER: Know when to stay out of your customer’s way

greet-your-customers-with-a-smileAs a customer service representative, your top priority is helping your customers. Believe it or not, sometimes that means getting out of their way! For example, if you work in a retail environment or have a customer waiting room, you’re probably around random customers throughout your shift. While acknowledging the customer is always polite, you may not need to go beyond that in certain situations.

Refer to these tips to know when you should approach your customer further or when you should take a few steps back:

  • If you’re setting up a floor display or stocking merchandise and a customer comes by, politely excuse yourself, get out of the way, and let him browse or pass by.
  • If your customer apologizes for being in your way, assure him that he is not in your way and encourage him to take his time with what he’s doing.
  • When you’re busy on the floor, don’t continue chatting on with your coworkers while ignoring your customers.
  • Always acknowledge a customer. Smile, say “hello,” and ask if you can help him with anything. If he answers “No thank you,” then let him know you’re available if he needs help, and get back to what you were working on. Give your customer the space he needs to browse.
  • If a customer needs something near an area where you are working but is taking his time to make up his mind, don’t sigh deeply signaling your annoyance. Remember that your customer is your top priority, not the side job you’re working on.
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Feb 19

CUSTOMER SERVICE CORNER: Say the magic words to satisfy customers

say-the-magic-wordsAs a customer service professional, you know that little things — an ill-chosen word or a lapse in your tone of voice — make a big difference when you want to satisfy customers.

Sometimes just being mindful of what sorts of phrases touch a nerve — and knowing what to say instead — makes the difference between a positive customer experience and a disgruntled customer.

Make the right choice with these three pairings to keep customers satisfied with you and your agency:

  • “I will” v. “I’ll try.” Don’t say “I’ll try…” when explaining what you’re going to do for a customer — she will be skeptical about whether she’ll get results. “I will…” sends a message of confidence. Use it even when you’re not certain of the outcome.
  • “Will you” v. “You have to.” “Will you” makes you appear polite and respectful of the customer’s time. “You have to” seems indifferent and calls attention to a possible inconvenience.
  • “That’s our policy” v. “Because…” Explaining the reason for any request of the customer — for identification or other information, for example — will foster cooperation and make the experience more pleasant for both of you.
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